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Douglas Newby
Architecturally Significant Homes
Horse & Trolly

Preservation Step Two

After identifying historic and architecturally significant homes, the next step is contacting the owners and working with them to develop a preservation strategy for their home. In 1995, very few people were aware of the Crespi Estate–out of sight, out of mind. Virtually no one, including Dallas architectural historians, knew that the architect was Maurice Fatio of Treanor & Fatio, one of the most important architects in the country in the 1920s and 1930s. Since this historic and architecturally significant home was on 20 acres in Mayflower Estates hidden from the street, it was destined to be torn down for a housing development. I was introduced to Mr. Robert Wigley, the son of Florence Crespi and trustee of the family holdings. Bob Wigley had been Vice Chairman of E.F. Hutton and continued to be an accomplished money manager for many prominent families. Mr. Wigley was very receptive to a plan to preserve the Crespi Estate after his mother’s death. We put in place a plan to find the right buyer to preserve the home and even the eventual sales contract had deed restrictions that prevented the property from being divided for some period of time. I will be eternally grateful for my opportunity to work with Robert Wigley, an incredibly smart and honorable man. I will also always be grateful that Mr. Wigley saved the home with the preservation plans we put in place. While some of the property has now been divided, the Crespi Estate survives. My work with the late Mr. Wigley on this very complex transaction is my favorite collaboration. You can read more about preservation Step Two in my blog article, Five Steps of Saving Homes. *Preservation Step Two

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